ECHO

Contemporary dance Reviews. Choose from the titles below in this column to display the corresponding review in the right column.

Berichte über zeitgenössischen Tanz. Wählen Sie aus den Titeln unten in dieser Spalte, um den Bericht in der rechten Spalte darzustellen.

ZKM Young Choreographers Session Jan 2014

Aslizadyan/Oliveira: Two 4 One

Montpellier Dance Festival 2007

Christian Spuck: The Children

vera | sander | art | connect TRESPASSING

Laureates: Africa/Indian Ocean

Eun Me Ahn: Please Hold My Hands

Lara Martelli: Solo mit Sahne

Akram Khan: Kaash

Junge Choreographen Folkwangschule 2003

Theater der Klänge: Modul|a|t|o|r|

Wim Vandekeybus: Blush

 

 

Theater der Klänge, modul|a|t|o|r|

Düsseldorf/Germany, 24 January 2003

Author: Jochen Krölls

Once more a modern stage production that integrates human action on stage with video in a unique way. This is more than dance and technology. It is a creative integration of dance, sound, music, and speech. A unique interaction of the individuals on stage with, to some degree pre-composed, sound and music. Dancers and actors on stage trigger the computer through a microphone attached to the stage floor and, I assume, cameras mounted in front and above stage. The piece is logically aligned to the designer LeCorbusier’s ideas and philosophy of proportion, the modulator, largely inspired by DaVinci’s Golden Ratio. Clemente Fernandez leads us through the evening in a charming and humourous way and deserves particular applause, accompanied by his colleague Jacqueline Fischer.

The opening dance could be Bauhaus inspired. No music or background sound. Only the steps and movements are audible that the dancers’ movments and steps create on the (wooden?) stage floor. Slowly the stage loudspeakers start amplifying these sounds. And similarly slowly the amplified sound is replaced with sound samples of musical instruments, partly electronically edited. Still more to come, these sounds now follow a rhythmic pattern that reversely triggers the dance on stage. Could not be more interactive and synchronous. In other scenes, the dancers’ intensity of movement conduct the intensity of musical movement. Could not be more organic.

The video screen which forms the hind stage limit shows us a 1:1 live moving picture of Carlos Martinez Paz’ dance movements. Increasingly, the computer slows down the speed of the screen display so that Carlos’ movements on screen compile more and more into white shadows and finally completely freeze in clouds. Very fascinating the way the screen display increasingly freezes until it is totally fixed.

Still more creative screen usage to come – the 1:1 live moving picture starts to multiply into a vertical stack of the same repeated image. Starting with two, the number of stacked images increases constantly. The further down in the stack, the more delayed becomes the display of the image. The more images in the stack the more intense becomes this effect. Until the images in the stack are so narrow horizontal stripes that the image itself can no longer be recognised. And, amazingly, in one mo(ve)ment, the composed image that the stack of stripes produce looks like the shade of the dancer again!

Less dramatically innovative, yet no less beautiful, a caleidoscope-like four-part point-symmetric image of the movements on stage completes the row of marvellous screen interactions.

What has moved me most is a scene close to the end. Clemente Fernandez takes off his socks and stands bare-footed next to the floor microphone. He starts moving his toes, which causes a squeaking, screeching noise, again with increasing audio amplification. It causes hiccups of laughter within me because Clemente accompanies this with incredible grimaces, as if he were playing an instrument (‘squeaker-screecher’?). Like in the beginning of Modul|a|t|o|r| the original, amplified sound starts moving slowly into organically triggering a harmonic sound environment. In this respect, indeed, Clemente is playing an instrument with his feet. The instrument, however, was created by ICEM member Thomas Neuhaus, who created the great spectrum of sound structures that enables the uncommon Modul|a|t|o|r| concept. (ICEM: Institute for Computer Music and Electronic Media which is a section of the Folkwang University of contemporary arts in Essen/Germany.)

What has moved me most is a scene close to the end. Clemente Fernandez takes off his socks and stands bare-footed next to the floor microphone. He starts moving his toes, which causes a squeaking, screeching noise, again with increasing audio amplification. It causes hiccups of laughter within me because Clemente accompanies this with incredible grimaces, as if he were playing an instrument (‘squeaker-screecher’?). Like in the beginning of Modul|a|t|o|r| the original, amplified sound starts moving slowly into organically triggering a harmonic sound environment. In this respect, indeed, Clemente is playing an instrument with his feet. The instrument, however, was created by ICEM member Thomas Neuhaus, who created the great spectrum of sound structures that enables the uncommon Modul|a|t|o|r| concept. (ICEM: Institute for Computer Music and Electronic Media which is a section of the Folkwang University of contemporary arts in Essen/Germany.)

An intelligent and logical, yet intutive and heart-intruding soul-mover, Modul|a|t|o|r| should not disappear after the performance of 2nd February 2003. Even if a small company like Theater der Klänge is incredibly productive and creative and must focus on new performances, I do hope there will be further Modul|a|t|o|r| performances. Anyway, if you can, go and experience one of the performances until 23rd February! Again, Jörg Lensing has proven how innovative, intelligent and modern, yet entertaining and popular stage play can be.

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